The top 4 Scary Movies That you Cannot Forget

What good scary movie doesn’t leave you feel really afraid to remain alone at home or move to a dark bathroom at night? If you haven’t experienced any scary sensations after watching a scary movie, you need to check out the top 4 scariest/horror movies of all time. These 4 horror films are considered the top scary movies of all time. This list is a little subjective and hence, the possibility exists you may not like them. So some pleasant advice – please go through the movie trailers of the horror movie you are considering seeing to determine if it is really worth watching.

There are some elements that make a horror movie worth watching. There are many horror movies which seem nothing more than comic movies. The movies worth watching are the ones which are pulse pounding, riveting, and unnerving and get you to really become squeezed inside a blanket on bed or squirming in your seat 8x movies. These movies create the best scary experience and make you really feel reluctant to go outside alone or stay alone. The four scary films discussed below are considered the top scary movies of all time.

A scary movie need not always be full of ghosts and apparitions. It can be anything like alien or a psycho killer or anything that creates some kind of spooky feeling inside you as you see one. Given below are four top scary movies of all time. Film exhibition began to thrive during the Colonial era, with Glover Memorial Hall playing host to a range of memorable films viewed by “potential Nigerians”, in August 1903 Wpit18. However, the non-availability of proper records reflecting the title of the debut film exhibited has created a lapse in the precedent stock. Notwithstanding the lacuna, the way had been paved for the exhibition of more foreign films at the Hall and other designated venues.

The emotionally traumatizing “Master – Servant” relationship, evident in the constant assaults, batteries, intimidation, segregation, victimization, carried out by the Colonial masters on the colonized, with darkened clouds of resentment, vengeance, thirst for freedom, giving way to splattering drops of such thoughts, instinctively projected through the colonized intermittent in-subordinate actions, began to spread amongst the blacks. The British knew they had to thread with caution if they still wanted to play “god” in their lives when films such as Tales of Manhattan, Trailer horn, Tarzan series began to stir up a revolution in the hearts of Blacks across the globe.

Aware of the lethal power of insurgency which could be unleashed through the Film medium, the British out of fear for their lives and possible loss of the Queen’s sovereignty took the bull by the horn, and swiftly created a Colonial Film Censors Board (FCB) in 1933 to censor and classify films before they were released for visual consumption by the public. Following the establishment of the board, Films such as “The primitive, primitive man, Dixie, Buffalo Bill, The Keys of the Kingdom, Sleepy Town Girl were tagged ‘suitable’ to be watched, while Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, Clive of India, The Isle of Forgotten Sins, House of Frankenstein were considered unsuitable for viewing.

The Censor’s body underwent a transformation process into the Federal Board of Film Censors (FBFC) from the aforementioned, and the laws from which the transformed body derived its powers ranged from the 1948 Cinematograph Laws of Nigeria, the Cinematograph Laws of 1963, to the 1963/64 Cinematograph Law and Regulations. The present National Film and Video Censors Board came into existence by virtue of decree, now Act 85 of 1993. The advent of Nigeria’s Independence (1960) and the Republican status (1963), heralded the dawn of a new era in all sectors.

“The Yoruba Travelling Theatre Group” of the 60’s and 70’s can be referred to as the “Fountain Head” of movie productions in Nigeria. The veterans with great Theatrical skills and great performances took their works beyond the stage, and dove into the sea of film productions using the Celluloid format. Notable film makers on the Roll call of Honour during the Celluloid boom era of the 70’s include Ola Balogun, Eddie Ugbomah, late Herbert Ogunde, Adeyemi Afolayan a. k. a Ade Love (father of Kunle Afolayan of the Irapada fame), Ladi Ladebo, Moses Adejumo, Adebayo Salami and Afolabi Adesanya.

The list of documented films produced during the 70’s era and transcending somewhat into the 80’s is simply astonishing and goes to show that the Movie Industry has been around much longer, contrary to the ‘1992 belief syndrome’ most have been injected with. Such works include Kongi Harvest (1971), Alpha (1972), Bull Frog in the Sun (1974), Amadi (1975), Ajani Ogun (1975), Muzik Man (1976), Bisi, Daughter of the River (1977), Ija Ominira (1978), Aiye (1979), Kadara (1980), Jaiyesimi (1980) Efunsetan Aniwura (1981), Cry Freedom (1981), Ija Orogun (1982) Owo L’Agba (1982).

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